EVENT SCHEDULE

2016

Jan 31: IN with Susanne Winterling

February 27 - 28: Private Workshop: Artist-run spaces

Mar 12: Exhibition: FORUM: Simon Benjamin

Mar 13: Artist Talk: FORUM: Simon Benjamin

Nov 12: Open Studio: Demi Walker

Nov 26: Portfolio Review (Private)

Dec 11: IN: Black female subjectivity: Autumn Knight, Julia Phillips, Joiri Minaya, Oneika Russell, Jessica Bell Brown

2017

Jan 15: Nosbuorne Lee: 48H Residency

Jan 29: IN: Art Residencies (Part I)

Feb 4: Leasho Johnson: Belisario & The Soundboy (10A West Kings House Rd)


 

FRIDAY, APRIL 21, 2017
Strange, how glad I am to mourn
ROSANNA MCLAUGHLIN
SATURDAY, APRIL 22



Image courtesy Jillian Steinhauer

NLS is pleased to invite you to Strange, how glad I am to mourn, a talk and exhibition of posters by the Guerilla Girls presented by Rosanna McLaughlin. This event is presented as part of the Trans Atlantic Artists' Residency Exchange (TAARE) at NLS, sponsored by the British Council.

Opens: Saturday, April 22, 7 p.m.
Free and open to the public, complimentary refreshments

When the artist Ana Mendieta died in 1985, many believed her husband, the minimalist sculptor Carl Andre, guilty of her murder. Andre was cleared of second degree murder in 1988, and protests have continued to take place when his work is exhibited.

During McLaughlin’s time as a TAARE resident at NLS, she has been speaking with artists and writers involved in the protest history, as well as those who have spoken out against it. Much debate has gathered around how best to remember Ana Mendieta, and who has the right to mourn her. This talk will be an attempt to find a path through this fractious history.

McLaughlin will also be exhibiting some of the ephemera produced as part of the protests, including posters by the Guerrilla Girls, and zines produced for the recent London demonstration.

About Rosanna McLaughlin
Rosanna McLaughlin is a writer and curator based in London. Her work has been published in Frieze magazine, Artsy, The White Review and BOMB. She was shortlisted for the Fitzcarraldo Essay Prize, 2016. Between 2011-2013 she co-ran Hobbs McLaughlin Gallery.

About the TAARE programme

TAARE focuses on exchanges between the United Kingdom (UK), Jamaica, and Trinidad and Tobago, and is is open to visual artists, art critics and curators in the UK and in the Caribbean. The program provides research and practice-based residencies while developing trans-Atlantic connections.

This event is made possible with support from Creative Sounds Limited and the British Council.

SUNDAY, JANUARY 29, 2017
LEASHO JOHNSON:
BELISARIO & THE SOUNDBOY

FEBRUARY 4 - 17

NLS presents the debut solo exhibition of new work by Leasho Johnson. The opening reception takes place on Saturday, February 4 at alternative location 10A West Kings House Road.

In his newest paintings and sculptures Johnson inserts his dancehall-influenced female avatars into colonial depictions of plantation life in Jamaica culled from Isaac Mendes Belisario’s 18th century paintings. Johnson uses Belisario’s depictions to create a counterpoint to the music of Vybz Kartel as a means to question power heirarchies, legitimacy, and subjugation within Jamaican culture. In this body of work Johnson deftly moves between techniques he has employed for the last seven years ranging from Japanese anime, street art, graphic design, ceramic sculpture, and 18th century painting creating humour as a means to cutting commentary about social mores.

Leasho Johnson's recent exhibitions include Jamaican Pulse at the Royal West England Academy (Bristol,UK), Jamaican Routes, Punkt Ø Galleri F15 and Momentum (Moss, Norway), FLOAT, Transformer (Washington, DC), The National Biennial, National Gallery of Jamaica (Kingston, Jamaica) and Masculinities IV, National Gallery of Jamaica. He was recently awarded the Davidoff Initiative Artist Residency at Residencies Unlimited (New York) and recently completed residencies at Bluecoat (Liverpool) in partnership with NLS and RWA, as well as Caribbean Link, Atelier’s 89 (Oragestad, Aruba). He has been an invited panelist for The Caribbean Queer Visualities Symposium at Yale University presented by Small Axe (Connecticut), as well as for Transformer's Framework panel at Art Museum of the Americas (Washington, DC). His work has been reviewed in The Fader, the Washington Post, Caribbean Beat, ARC Magazine and the Jamaica Observer. Johnson received his BFA in Visual communication & graphic design from the Edna Manley College of the Visual & Performing arts.

FRIDAY, MARCH 11, 2016
FORUM: SIMON BENJAMIN
March 12 - April 15

NLS introduces FORUM, an exhibition of recent work by Jamaican-born, Brooklyn-based artist Simon Benjamin. This body of work is based on Benjamin's visit to the mystery-enshrouded, abandoned hotel The Forum in Port Henderson, just outside of Kingston. The work consists of a series of Photographs and site-specific installation at NLS.

The Forum opened its doors in 1973 and closed in 1978, coinciding with a tumultuous period of Jamaica’s history. For the artist's entire life the Hotel has been defunct and largely left to deteriorate with starts of re-usage in various capacities. For the first time on a visit back to Jamaica, Benjamin trespassed into the property to investigate and learn more about this building, the product of which is this exhibition.

Opening reception: Saturday, March 12, 2016 from 5:30 p.m. - 8:30 p.m.

Artist Talk: Sunday, March 13, 2016 from 6:00 p.m. - 7:30 p.m., featuring invited panelist Judith Bruce, and moderated by LinYee Yuan.

PDF of essay on exhibition for ARC Magazine.

These events are free and open to the public.

FRIDAY, MARCH 20, 2015

INSIDES

CAMILLE CHEDDA
ONEIKA RUSSELL
PHILLIP THOMAS
PRUDENCE LOVELL
March 28 - April 28


NLS is pleased to present Insides an exhibition of new work by Camille Chedda, Oneika Russell, Phillip Thomas and Prudence Lovell. Insides is an exhibition of contemporary drawing by four exciting artists who engage this medium as a significant part of their art practice. Chedda, Russell, Thomas and Lovell present new approaches to an age-old medium, positing drawing as a valid means of contemporary expression. On view from March 28 to April 28.

Opening party: Saturday, March 28, 6 - 9 p.m.

This event is free and open to the public.


PHOTOS OF OPENING RECEPTION

SATURDAY, JANUARY 24, 2015
MAY NOTHING STAY HIDDEN
MALAIKA BROOKS-SMITH-LOWE
January 24 - February 16


The work presented in May Nothing Stay Hidden was created by Malaika Brooks-Smith-Lowe during her six week art residency at NLS. Brooks-Smith-Lowe explores the impact of migration on family, drawing from audio conversations, found photographic film as well as salvaged furniture discovered as she navigated his birthplace. Malaika Brooks-Smith-Lowe constructs an intimate portrait of the mindscape that surround migration as well as a persistent hope for transcending these complex emotions.

Artist Statement
Inspired by conversations with my grandfather, Derryck Brooks- Smith, this mixed media installation is an intergenerational investigation of the ambivalence of life. Born in Jamaica in 1940 Grandada was left in the care of an aunt and uncle, at an early age, until he could travel up to the US to live with his mother. This is a deeply familiar story of Caribbean people across generations. His experiences of separation and longing left him with dense emotions to navigate as he grew up. What wounds are left untended in the business of keeping dirty laundry tucked away? May Nothing Stay Hidden explores the burdens of a culture of non-communication through the lens of love, migration and memory.

This installation is composed of audio from a conversation with Grandada, wooden doors, glass panels, tea-dyed paper, LED lights, dried flowers, video and old medium format negatives found amongst his mother’s boxes. As his contemplations float through the space, visitors are invited to open custom-made light box cupboards and peek into a vintage canvas trunk.

About Malaika Brooks-Smith-Lowe
Malaika Brooks-Smith-Lowe is a Grenada-based artist of Jamaican decent. She has exhibited her work across the Caribbean at the National Gallery of Jamaica, the Trinidad and Tobago Film Festival (Trinidad and Tobago), The Fresh Milk Art Platform (Barbados), and SO((U))L HQ (Jamaica). She received a BA in studio art from Smith College (Northampton, MA).

Listen to Malaika on IN podcast


PHOTOS OF OPENING RECEPTION

SUNDAY, AUGUST 17, 2014
NLS + ARC
(E)MERGE ART FAIR

Above: Image courtesy Mark King

NLS and preeminent Caribbean contemporary art publication ARC Magazine collaborate to present an exhibition at (e)merge art fair of work by James Cooper (Bermuda), Stephanie Cormier (Canada), Ian Deleón (Cuba/Brazil), Nadia Huggins (St. Vincent), Leasho Johnson (Jamaica), Becca Kallem (Washington, DC), Mark King (Barbados), Oneika Russell (Jamaica), Anabel Vasquez Rodriguez (Puerto Rico) and Storm Saulter (Jamaica). The exhibition connects a contemporary sensibility across national borders in which the delicate nature of humanity and its complex dependency on the economic, environmental and cultural context that it also has a hand in molding is forefront. The exhibition is curated by Deborah Anzinger and Holly Bynoe.

The fourth edition of (e)merge takes place October 2-5, 2014 at the Rubell Family’s Capitol Skyline Hotel, in Washington, DC. The (e)merge art fair connects emerging-art professionals from around the globe with collectors, curators and cultural decision makers in Washington, DC. The GALLERY PLATFORM features participating galleries in hotel rooms and other spaces on designated floors. The ARTIST PLATFORM features a vetted selection of works by independent artists throughout the hotel’s public areas and grounds. (e)merge’s two exhibition platforms inspire a new echelon of art collectors and provide curatorial access to the latest movements in emerging art.

(e)merge

October 2 - 5
Capitol Skyline Hotel


WEDNESDAY, MAY 7, 2014
CANOPY GUILD
RODELL WARNER
AFIFA AZA
AI YOSHIDA
AYANA RIVIÈRE
DI-ANDRE C. DAVIS
LEASHO JOHNSON
STORM SAULTER


New Local Space is proud to invite you to the opening of Canopy Guild a collaborative group exhibition of work by Rodell Warner, Afifa Aza, Ai Yoshida, Ayana Riviere, Di-Andre C. Davis, Leasho Johnson and Storm Saulter. These seven artists worked together for the last 7 weeks on a project conceived by Rodell Warner to bridge creatives in the Kingston art scene via digital patterns Warner created from nature photographs. Each artists reinterpreted Warner's patterns to create a piece for this exhibition. Please join NLS to witness the culmination of this ambitious project.

Opening reception: Friday, May 9 from 7 - 9 PM,
NLS, 190 Mountain View Avenue, Kgn 6

Exhibition runs from May 9 - May 31 (by appointment only)


Rodell Warner (b. Port of Spain, Trinidad, 1986) is an interdisciplinary artists that works primarily in digital media lWarner captures or appropriates photos of nature then digitally manipulates them. He has exhibited regionally and internationally at spaces such as Alice Yard and Medulla Gallery in Port-of-Spain, Trinidad, CAG(e) Gallery, Edna Manley College in Kingston, Jamaica, and NIROX Projects in Johannesburg, South Africa. His work was featured in “Pictures from Paradise: A Survey of Contemporary Caribbean Photography” (Robert and Christopher, 2012).

DJ Afifa Aza (b. Spanish Town, Jamaica, 1981) uses her sonic explorations to end silence and continually critique social, political and cultural issues. Using her music to bob and weave through time, she juxtaposes simple and direct with the very problematic. Grounded in a strong Afrocentric worldview, Afifa’s metropolitan aesthetic emphasizes community while celebrating individual expression. She is co-founder and creative director of the SO((U))L HQ and Di Institute for Social Leadership, two emerging experimental spaces in Kingston Jamaica.

Ai Yoshida (b.Tokyo, Japan 1976) is a clothing designer who has been making contemporary clothing from vintage kimono fabric for the last 10 years. Her love of music and culture brought her to Kingston, Jamaica in 2004 where she produces music. Ayana Riviere (b. Barataria, Trinidad, 1984) has worked as a clothing designer for five years. Her work has appeared in Rolling Stone and she has been featured in the Jamaica Observer and Time Out London.

Di-Andre C. Davis (b. Kingston, Jamaica, 1986 is a self-described passionate mystery maker who immerses into her creative space to articulate her visions through the computer.

Leasho Johnson (b. Westmoreland, Jamaica, 1984) works in painting, ceramics, graphic and fashion design. Johnson renders the raw and rejected of contemporary Jamaican culture using techniques traditionally esteemed in Jamaica. He adopts Kawaii aesthetic from Japanese art to reference dancehall. He has shown locally at the National Gallery of Jamaica, and internationally at Kadé Gallery in the Netherlands, and Real Art Ways in Connecticut. He received his BFA in Visual Communication at the Edna Manley College of the Visual and Performing Arts in Jamaica (2009).

Storm Saulter (b. Negril, Jamaica 1983) is a visual artist, screenwriter, cinematographer, and film director. He graduated from The Los Angeles Film School in 2001 with a focus in Cinematography and Editing. His work has been reviewed by the LA Times, NY Times, LA Weekly and the Huffington Post.

THURSDAY, APRIL 10, 2014
FLOAT
Leasho Johnson, Marlon James, Rodell Warner, Deborah Anzinger



New Local Space is pleased to collaborate with Transformer in their presentation of the exhibition FLOAT in Washington, DC. In the contemporary moment, “the nation” dominates much Caribbean image-making, often posited as a post-colonial response to oppressive, externally- derived constructions. This focus is shifted by the artists in FLOAT, and further curated into a détournement in which these hegemonic conceptions of social and national identity (and the status of “margin” itself) are declared compromised and inadequate. The proposed exhibition posits a renegotiation of identity; untethered by the limits normally placed on that now over-worked concept, and insistent on the recognition of the invisible but central role that the “margins” play in the making of our cosmopolitan present and future.

Curated by Nicole Smythe-Johnson.

About the Artists:

Leasho Johnson
Jamaican artist Leasho Johnson (b. 1984) works in painting and ceramics. Johnson renders the raw and rejected of contemporary Jamaican culture using techniques traditionally esteemed in Jamaica. His work included in the show is Ghetto Mother and Children, a ceramic avatar that adopts the Kawaii aesthetic from Japanese art to depict an inner-city woman surrounded by her bawling babies.

Marlon James
Jamaican artist Marlon James (b. 1980) works primarily in digital photography. James captures subjects that defy hegemonic conceptions of Jamaican-ness and/or are deemed unsuitable subjects for fine art. His images redefine his subjects, framing them as icons and stars.


Rodell Warner
Trinidadian artist Rodell Warner (b. 1986) is a largely, but not exclusively, digital artist. The works included in this exhibition are drawn from his most prolific body of work- gif images. Warner captures or appropriates photos of nature then digitally manipulates them— fragmenting, reflecting and animating them— until they become fluttering object-creatures navigating digital environments. These works question the relevance of authenticity and authorship in contemporary culture. They also traverse and blur the lines between the natural and digital worlds.

Deborah Anzinger
Jamaican artist Deborah Anzinger (b. 1978) uses paint, quotidian imagery and objects as well as living plants to create spaces that playfully co-opt the audience in the deconstruction and reimagining of the social and physical environments we occupy. Her work uses an almost psychedelic palette and a hand-painted digital aesthetic to reference primal concepts and instinctual recognition, especially those prehistorically required for sustenance and survival (eg. facial recognition and breast feeding in infants). Taking these symbols and displacing them in new contexts, Anzinger highlights the evolution of particular imagery into symbols that carry meanings of abundance, mystery and knowledge.

Opening reception: May 17, 2014
May 17 - June 21

Transformer
1404 P Street
Washington, DC 20005

Exhibition essay

MONDAY JULY 22, 2013
LAGAN: AN EXHIBITION OF RECENT WORK BY WILMER WILSON IV

Please join us for Lagan, a solo exhibition of recent work by Wilmer Wilson IV made during his two month art residency at NLS.

In legal contexts, "lagan" refers to cargo thrown into the sea with the intention of its retrieval. In his new work Wilmer retrieves and organises the submerged cargo of the street, the neighborhood, and the city. These sculptural arrangements echo forms encountered in everyday spaces in Kingston, Jamaica and Washington, DC. In this body of work, signifiers of age, decay, and blight are revealed to be richer, more complex vessels of time and space.

Opening party takes place Saturday, August 10 from 6 – 9 PM. The exhibition takes place from Saturday, August 10 – Thursday, August 15 (by appointment). For more information contact 406-9771 or NLSkingston@gmail.com.
MONDAY, MARCH 18, 2013
INTIMATE ENCOUNTERS
MARLON JAMES



NLS presents the first solo exhibition of Marlon James' photographs. James' portraits take us on a journey, via his inquisitive eye and voracious appetite for intimacy with his subjects, as he attempts to answer the question "who is a Jamaican?". Through these individualistic photographs we are presented flashes of subcultures and the mainstream that introduce us to a collective self we may not know.

Exhibition opens Saturday, March 23, 2013 until May 3 (by appointment).


A LIVE STREAMING CONVERSATION BETWEEN MARLON JAMES AND NLS' DEBORAH ANZINGER IS NOW ARCHIVED AT OUR YOUTUBE CHANNEL.
LISTEN HERE


PHOTOS FROM OPENING RECEPTION

THURSDAY, APRIL 5, 2012
"PAINT ON KNOWN"
CHAJANA DENHARDER AND DEBORAH ANZINGER
Image courtesy of Chajana denHarder

Paint On Known is a collaborative exhibition between Chajana denHarder and Deborah Anzinger that bridges photography and painting to create systems in which decay, distorted perception and the metaphysical co-exist. Within each artist’s practice she attempts to closely connect with photographic scenes, but in doing so negates, abstracts, distorts and adds to the original source imagery. In doing this, previously static photographs, now infused with layers of paint, grids and projections, become something wild, unknowable and in some ways more real to the artists.

This project is an attempt by the two artists to create a system in which the similarities and differences between their individual modes of working interact, add, speak to then ultimately transcend their individual artistic practice.

Exhibition presented by Hillyer Art Space
9 Hillyer Court, NW, Washington, DC
July 6 - July 28, 2012